Cornish Folk Tradition: Songs Music Dance and Associated Customs
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Cornish Dance: Miller's Dance
The Millers dance was given to Andrew Chapman by Bill Harvey and his Aunt Rose ( The family lived on Goss Moor and Andrew was an early member of Cam Kernewek). The dance was recorded in 1984 but remembered from Tea Treats 60 years before. It seems to have been well known in the area as many members of Withiel Women’s Institute remembered it as did some of the local musicians who were invited to take part in a revival of the Snail Creep . All were young at the time and seem to have greatly enjoyed the spectacle.
Formation: Couples, 2 behind 2 in a ring, holding hands, all facing the same way (lady on her partners right)
Steps Walking Step Dons_an_Melynor
   
Bars  
1-8 All walk briskly forward then let go hands
9-16 Ladies continue in the same direction, men turn and walk in the opposite direction.
17-24 All swing the person immediately beside them returning to the original formation by bar 24.
   
On the next repeat of the dance the ladies change direction
Dancers without a partner should go to the middle of the ring and collect one!
 
Tune: An Melinor / The Miller Midi
To add interest and make sense of the dance a further eight bars have been added to the tune learned by Andrew Chapman. These bars are a tune fragment collected by Dunstan and described by him as an old Perranzabuloe melody to which the words of the Old Grey Duck were sometimes sung. They leave the tune unresolved musically and drive the dance back into a series of repeats that can get faster and faster.
     
   
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