Cornish Folk Tradition: Songs Music Dance and Associated Customs
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Cornish Dance: Ros Veur
This dance is based on the figure known as ‘Le Grande Ronde’ in the quadrilles found at Trelaworran. Ros Veur means ‘big circle’ in Cornish and provides the opportunity to use tea treat polka tunes popular in Cornwall at the end of the 19th Century together with the furry dance step.
Formation: Four couple square set
Steps ‘One two three hop’ step throughout Polka_Aberfal
   
Bars  
1-4 All form a circle, advance bringing hands to centre and retire.
5-8 Repeat 1 – 4.
9-12 Head couples advance and retire.
13-14 Head couples step to right and then to left.
15-16 Head couples change places by giving right hand to opposites.
17-24 Head couples repeat 9 – 16, thus returning to positions.
25-32 Grand ladies chain, i.e. all ladies right hand star half way around. Turn opposite gentleman, left hand (gentleman placing free right hand on lady’s waist). Ladies right hand star again, left hand turn with own partner.
The entire dance is repeated three more times, next by side couple then heads then sides to finish.
Tune: Polka Aberfal / Falmouthy Polka The music used for the sequence at Trelowarren was called ‘Falmouth’ - thus the use of the traditional tune Falmouth Polka / Polka Aberfal.Midi
     
   
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