Cornish Folk Tradition: Songs Music Dance and Associated Customs
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Cornish Dance: Tremadheves
Although Borlase does not provide a description of the dance “Tremadheves” in his “Natural History of Cornwall” he does give us a clue in that it was circular and represented to him the stone circles such as those at Boscawen Un or Minions. In 1980 this sliver of information encouraged the authors to write a dance based on a circle which preserved a number of elements from dancing tradition in Cornwall. This included the Harvey Darvey hand hold; the clockwise / counter clockwise movements of the millers dance; a “roll tobacco” spiral; and the furry dance step. In this way Tremadheves became symbolic of the increasing interest in Cornish Dance traditions. The name was associated with a dance of great antiquity but used to display elements that triggered memories and narratives of more recent traditions. A direct result of this “invoking of cultural memory” has been a much better understanding of dance tradition in Cornwall. Were we to reconstruct Tremedheves today, however, we would probably be inclined to a simpler dance based on a carole.
Formation:Four Couples in a square set, lady on gentleman`s right
Steps `One two three hop` step St_Just_Cock_Dance
Hold Couples hold both hands , crossed behind the back in such a way as to be able to turn away from each other and reverse direction without breaking hold (or arms!).
Bars  
1-4 Two steps in, turn (couples turn away from each other hands remaining joined), two steps out.
5-8 Repeat 1 4, release hands and face partner (ie gentleman should be facing anti clockwise).
9-16 Everybody dances eight steps around the circle in direction they are facing, ladies passing inside gentleman, effectively forming two circles, one inside the other moving in opposite directions.
17-24 Ladies dance out in front of their own partner and then around behind him back into centre of dance. Arms resting on each others shoulder to form a circle dance for four steps before turning right shoulder back to finish beside their partner. In the meantime men continue around the circle for eight steps.
25-32 As 9 – 16.
33-40 Men dance behind their partner into the centre, raising left arm to place hand on next man’s right shoulder to form a wheel. Dance once around and out in front of own partners to places. In The meantime ladies continue around the circle for eight steps.
42-48 As 9 16. When partners meet, join right hands, lady dances under partner’s right arm and behind him and adjust hands to form one large circle.
49-56 Dance eight steps around the circle.
57-64 First gentleman leads the dancers into a fairly tight spiral. On final bar all raise hands and shout.
   
The suggested tune for this dance is the St Just Cock Dance/An Dons Kulyek Lanest, a Tea Treat Tune given to Ralph Dunstan in May 1929 by Mr Horton Bolitho of Falmouth Midi
   
    Midi
   
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